Living History Association

35th Alabama Infantry & 73rd Indiana Infantry Regiment

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Projected Strength

Company
Total
Aggregate
Bataillon (Maj. Matthew Mallory/Léon Queyrouze
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
Compagnie A (vacant command)
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
Compagnie B (Capt. Taylor Bishop)
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
Compagnie C (vacant command)
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
Compagnie D (vacant command)
T.B.A.
T.B.A.
Total
T.B.A.
T.B.A.

Portrayal

We will be portraying the Orleans Guard Battalion; a New Orleans raised battalion of four companies and a battery with large Creole, French, and Hispanic membership. They are noted for the blue uniforms that they wore, which caused a friendly fire incident at the Battle of Shiloh. They second day they wore their jackets inside out in an effort to deter such occurrence. It should be noted that among the rolls of the Orleans Guard Battalion is an absent private on duty, none other than General P. G. T. Beauregard.

 

The Garde served in the Third Brigade of Col. Preston Pond, jr., in Brig. Gen. Daniel Ruggles’ First Division of the Second Army Corps of Maj. Gen. Braxton Bragg, Army of the Mississippi under command of Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, and later Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard.

Rations

The original unit had very little, and at times no, food during the Battle of Shiloh. On the 4th they did get some meat and some biscuits and were told to eat only a fraction of it. Authentic rations should include only bits of meat and some biscuits. If permitted for the battle, we will “raid” a captured Union camp, in which we stuff ourselves with hot bread, fruits, delicacies, and wine (Grape Juice, again; battle). The diary mentions that the food gathered during this moment was enough to feed ten regiments. We’ll stuff ourselves at this one. If we are not permitted to raid a captured Union camp, the provisions will be dealt out upon arrival back to camp.

Drill

Drill will be conducted in the French language, with the commands taken from the Règlement sur l’Exercice et les Manœuvres des Régiments d’Infanterie, de Carabiniers et de Chasseurs à Pied. The actual movements, however, will be that of Rifle and Infantry Tactics Revised and Improved by William J. Hardee.

Every effort must be made prior to the event to familiarize the company in the French commands. If, however, it proves unfeasible in practice, then the battalion command may revert the drill to the English translation.

 

Each company will be expected to drill at least once every day of the event, including the first official day (usually a Friday or Thursday). The battalion will also drill at least once a day.

Battalion and Company Commanders

Battalion
Major: Matthew Joe Mallory portraying Léon Queyrouze.
Adjutant-Major: Vacant.
Sergeant-Major: Pending.
Quartermaster: Pending.
Surgeon: Vacant.
Chaplain: Pending.
Trumpeter: Vacant.

Color Guard
Color Sergeant: Vacant.
Color Guards:

Company Commanders
Company A: Vacant.
Company B: Capt. Taylor Bishop.
Company C: Vacant
Company D: Vacant

Ammunition

The Orleans Guard Battalion started out on the 2nd of April with orders to have five days rations and 100 rounds of ammunition. The diary makes repeated mention of having limited to no rations but does not mention any further the case of ammunition. As such, we will ensure that we have 100 rounds of ammunition for every man during the entire battle.

Tentage

The Orleans Guard Battalion had wonderful tents, as one would expect from wealthy New Orleans citizens, with a Commandant (Major) whose father served as an officer under Napoleon Bonaparte himself. Sadly, they had to leave all of these behind. The Orleans Guard Battalion bivouacked for this battle and suffered heavily from the rain as a result. As we will be permitted not only authentic campaigners, but mainstream impressions as well, those who choose to bring their tents may do so. There is some historical basis of the use of tents at Shiloh, as some units made use of captured camps. Some within Pond’s brigade are among these number, though I have seen no solid evidence of the Orleans Guard being of one of those.

Company Makeup

There will be four companies of infantry. Each company should have as near to thirty-three men as possible, permitting twenty privates, four corporals, four sergeants, one first-sergeant, two second-lieutenants, one first-lieutenant, and one captain.

 

Anyone interested in raising a company should contact Matthew Joe Mallory via Facebook, or email at [email protected] All companies are to secure the proper uniforms, but one company will be designated as the “mainstream” company and will be permitted the use of A-Frame/Wedge and Wall tents.

 

The Garde de Drapeau will be required to contain the full nine men, consisting of eight corporals and one sergeant. They will be carrying a reproduction of the Orleans Guard Battalion battle flag, and during one battle scenario will suffer tremendous casualties. Color Guardsmen should be aware that they will not be firing their muskets, save for the defense of the colors if necessary. Though we cannot have the original flagstaff of the Orleans Guard, made of a splinter of the flagstaff of Fort Sumter, we will act as if it was made of that sacred relic.

 

The battalion field and staff will consist of one major, one adjutant-major, one surgeon, one chaplain, one quartermaster, one sergeant-major, and one trumpeter.